UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India – UP Board Guide


UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India Textbook Questions and Answers, Additional Important Questions

UP Board Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India InText Questions and Answers

Activity and In-text Questions

Let’s Discuss (Page No. 43)

(1) Some people say that the Bengal famine happened because there was a shortage of rice. Study the table and find out whether you agree with the statement.
(2) Which year shows a drastic decline in food availability?
Table 1. Production of Rice in the province of Bengal
UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India - 1


Source : Sen, A.K., 1981 Page 61.
Answer:
(1) No, I do not agree with the statement that the Bengal famine happened because there was a shortage of rice. The above
table shows that one year before the famine, i.e., in 194UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter2, Bengal was not only self-sufficient in rice but it exported 1 lakh tonnes of rice. Even in 1943, when the famine happened, the total availability of rice in the province was 79 lakh tonnes. This was 9 lakh tonnes more than the total availability of rice in 1941.

(2) The year 1941 shows a drastic decline in food availability.

Suggested Activity (Page No. 48)

Question 1.
Gather detailed information about some of the programmes initiated by the government, which have food component.

Hint : Rural Wage Employment Programme, Employment Guarantee Scheme, Sampurna Grameen Rojgar Yojana, Mid¬day Meal, Integrated Child Development Services, etc.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Discuss with your teacher.
Answer:
The following are the main programmes initiated by the government, which have food component:
(1) Rural Wage Employment Programme (RWEP) ; The first major wage-employment programme was introduced in the 1960s to provide employment in the rural areas. Since then several rural wage employment schemes have been announced from time- to-time under various names. In September 2001, all the existing rural employment schemes were merged under the new Sampooma Grameen Rojgar Yojna (SGRY). Further, the National Rural Employment Guarantee (NREG) was launched in August 2005 to address rural poverty and empower poor people.

(2) Employment Guarantee Scheme (EGS), 2005 : This scheme provides 100 days’ assured employment every year to every rural household. One-third of the proposed jobs would be reserved for women. The Central Government will establish National Employment Guarantee Funds. State governments will also establish State Employment Guarantee Funds. If an applicant is not provided employment within 15 days, he/she will be entitled to a daily employment allowance. ’

(3) Sampurna Grameen Rojgar Yojana (SGRY), 2001: This Yojana was introduced by merging the earlier two programmes: Jawahar Gram Samriddhi Yojana (JGSY) and Employment Assurance Scheme (EAS). This is a centrally sponsored scheme. As parts of the wages, 5 kg of foodgrains per-man-day is ensured to provide to all unemployed rural workers. And the remaining parts of the wages
are paid in cash. About 100 crore man-days of employment are said to be generated every year through this scheme.

(4) Mid-day Meal Scheme (MMS), 1995 : This scheme was launched for the benefit of students in primary schools. This is mainly a Central Government sponsored scheme. Under this scheme, foodgrains are supplied free of cost at the rate of 100 grams per child per school per day. And cooked hot meal with a minimum content of 300 calories is served in the school.

(5) Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme, 1975: This scheme targets the most vulnerable groups of population including children upto 6 years of age, pregnant women and nursing mothers. This scheme provides a package of services such as supplementary nutrition, pre-school education, immunization, health check-up, referral services, nutrition and health education.

UP Board Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India Textbook Questions and Answers

Exercises Of Ncert (Page No. 53)

Question 1.
How is food security ensured in India?
Answer:
To ensure food security in India, the following measures are being adopted:
(1) Buffer Stock :
(i) This is created to distribute foodgrains in the deficit areas and among poorer sections of society at a price lower than the market price.
(ii) This also helps to resolve the problem of shortage of food during adverse weather conditions or during the period of calamity.

(2) Public Distribution System: The food stored in buffer stock is distributed through government regulated ration shops among the poorer sections of- the society. This is called the Public Distribution System (PDS). Foodgrains, sugar, kerosene oil, etc. are sold in these ration shops at a price lower than the market price.

(3) Other Programmes: In addition to the programmes like Integrated Child Development Services (1975), Food-for-Work (1977-78), Mid-Day Meals, various poverty alleviation programmes increase food security by raising income of the people in India.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 2.
Which are the people more prone to food insecurity?
Answer:
Economic Viewpoint :
(1) The people who are more prone to food insecurity, especially in rural areas, are: landless agricultural labourers, traditional artisans, providers of traditional services, petty self-employed workers, beggars, etc.
(2) While in the urban areas, the families of daily wages casual labourers, labourers employed in ill-paid occupations are more prone to food insecurity. These labourers are mostly engaged in seasonal activities. They receive very low wages.

Social Viewpoint :
(1) The scheduled castes, scheduled tribes and lower castes among other backward classes with poor land-base or very low land productivity are more prone to food insecurity.
(2) In addition, elderly people, women and female children are also vulnerable to food insecurity. Even the unborn babies are at the risk of malnutrition. A significant part of pregnant, nursing mothers and children under 5 years of age are food insecure in India.

Question 3.
Which states are more food insecure in India ?
Answer:
Some states are more food insecure in India.
(1) They are economically backward states, tribal and remote areas, the regions more prone to natural disasters, etc.
(2) The states like Bihar, Odisha (formerly Odisha), Uttar Pradesh, especially eastern and south-eastern parts of the state, Jharkhand, West Bengal, Chhattisgarh, many parts of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra constitute an important segment of the food insecure population of the country.
(3) Till 2015-16, almost one-third of the population of Bihar and Odisha was below poverty line and vulnerable to food insecurity. Thus, food insecure people are disproportionately large in some states of the country.

Question 4.
Do you believe that Green Revolution has made India self-sufficient in foodgrains? How?
Answer:
Yes, I do believe that the Green Revolution has made India self-sufficient in foodgrains. ‘
(1) To achieve self-sufficiency in foodgrains, India adopted a new strategy in agriculture which resulted in the ‘Green Revolution’ in 1960s. This revolution happened especially in the production of wheat and rice.
(2) The highest growth rate was achieved in Punjab and Haiyana, where foodgrain production reached an all-time high of 265 million tonnes in 2013-14. While the production in Bihar, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and the north-eastern states increased very slowly.
(3) Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh recorded a significant production in field of wheat which was 26.87 and 17.69 million tonnes in 2015-16 respectively.
(4) On the other hand, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh recorded significant increase of rice 15.75 and 12.51 million tonnes in 2015-16 respectively.
(5) Since the advent of the Green Revolution, India has never faced famine-like situation and has become self-sufficient in ‘ foodgrains.
(6) With the increase in production, we do not have to import foodgrains from other countries.
(7) A variety of crops are grown all over the country.
(8) The availability of foodgrains in the country even in adverse weather conditions, is sufficient.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 5.
A section of people in India are still without food. Explain?
Answer:
The following sections of people in India are still without food or more prone to food security: –
(1) The worst affected groups are landless people with little or no land to depend upon. The other group includes traditional artisans, providers of traditional services, petty self-employed workers and destitutes including beggars.
(2) In the urban areas the food insecure people are those whose working members are generally employed in ill-paid occupations and casual labour market. These workers are largely engaged in seasonal activities and are paid very low wages that just ensure bare survival.
(3) The SCs, STs and some sections of OBCs who have either poor land-base or very low land productivity are prone to food insecurity.
(4) The people affected by natural disasters, who have to migrate to other areas in search of work, are also among the most food \ insecure people.
(5) A large proportion of pregnant and nurshing mothers and children under the age of five years constitute an important segment of the food insecure population. ,

Question 6.
What happens to the supply of food when there is a ^ disaster or a calamity?
Or
How is food security affected during calamity ? Explain. (Most Imp.)
Answer:
The food security is affected during calamities in the following ways :
(1) Due to a natural calamity, say drought or flood, total production of foodgrains decreases.
(2) Decrease in production of foodgrains causes shortage of food
in the affected areas.
(3) Due to shortage of food, the prices go up. At the high prices, some people cannot afford to buy food.
(4) If such calamity happens in a wide area or is stretched over a longer time period, it may cause a situation of starvation.
(5) A massive starvation may take a form of famine which may cause death of thousands of people.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 7.
Differentiate between seasonal hunger and chronic hunger.
Answer:
The differences between chronic hunger and seasonal

Question 8.
What has our government done to provide food security to the poor? Discuss any two schemes launched by the government.
Answer:
(1) The Government of India has taken following steps to provide food security to the poor :
(i) Public Distribution System (PDS) is the most important step taken by the Government of India towards ensuring food security.
(ii) In 1992, Revamped Public Distribution System was introduced in 1700 blocks in the country. The target was to provide the benefits of PDS to remote and backward areas. The Targeted Public Distribution System was introduced for the first time that a differential price policy was adopted for the poor and non-poor.
(iii) The government established buffer stocks meant to distribute foodgrains in the deficit areas and among the poorer strata of society at a price lower than the market price. This also helps resolve the problem of shortage of food during adverse weather condition or during the period of calamity.

(2) Government also launched special schemes with special target groups.
(i) AntyodayaAnna Yojna (AAY): It was launched in December 2000. Here poor families are identified and 35 kg foodgrains per month was made available to each eligible family at a highly subsidized rate
(ii) AnnaPuraa Scheme (APS): It was launched targeting the indigent senior citizens.
(iii) National Food Security Act (NFSA): This Act provides for food and nutritional security life at affordable prices and enable people to live a life with dignity.

Question 9.
Why is buffer stock created by the government ? (Annual Exam. (Delhi), 2009)
Or
Mention the purpose of procuring food from the farmers by the government. (2015-7ZUA2P5, Imp.)
Answer:
(1) The purpose of procuring food from the farmers by the government is to distribute foodgrains in the deficit areas and among the poorer strata of society at a price lower them the market price also known as Issue Price.
(2) This also helps resolve the problem of shortage of food during adverse weather conditions or during the periods of calamity.
(3) The food procured by the FCI is distributed through government regulated ration shops.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 10.
Write notes on :
(а) Minimum support price
(b) Buffer stock
(c) Issue price
(d) Fair price shops
Answer:
(a) Minimum support price: It is the price at which the government, through Food Corporation of India, purchases foodgrains from the farmers in the states where there is surplus production.
(b) Buffer stock : It is the stock of foodgrains procured by the government. For example, surplus production of wheat and rice is stocked by the government through Food Corporation of India (FCI).
(c) Issue price : This is the price at which the government distributes its purchased and stored foodgrains in the deficit areas and among the poor sections of the society. This price is lower than the market price.
(d) Fair price shops : The food stored by the FCI is distributed at a price lower than the market price through government regulated ration shops among the poorer sections of the society all over the country. These ration shops are also known as fair price shops. Any family with a ration card can buy a specific amount of foodgrains, kerosene, sugar, etc. every month from the ration shop.

Question 11.
What are the problems of functioning of ration shops ?
Answer:
There Eire various problems of functioning of ration shops :
(1) The ration shop dealers are generally found resorting to malpractices like diverting the grains to open market to get better margin.
(2) The dealers sell poor quality grains at ration shops.
(3) The dealers do not open ration shops regularly.
(4) When ration shops are unable to sell poor quality grains, a massive stock of foodgrains piles up with the FCI.
(5) Many dishonest dealers weigh less and thus, cheat illiterate customers.
(6) Earlier every family of poor and non-poor had a ration card. But now there are three types of cards and three different prices. The family above the poverty line gets very little discount at the ration shop, so there is little incentive for them to buy these items from the ration shop.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 12.
Write a note on the role of cooperatives in providing food and related items.
Answer:
The co-operatives also play important role in food security in India, especially in the southern and western parts of the country.
(1) The co-operative societies set up shops to sell low priced goods to poor people, e.g., in Tamil Nadu, around 94 percent shops are run by the co-operatives.
(2) Mother Dairy, in Delhi, is making strides in provision of milk and vegetables to the consumers at controlled rate which is decided by Delhi government.
(3) Amul is another success story of co-operatives in milk and milk products from Gujarat. It has brought about White Revolution in India.
(4) In Maharashtra, Academy of Development Science (ADS) has facilitated a network of NGOs for setting up grain banks in different regions.
(5) The ADS Grain Bank Programme is acknowledged as a successful and innovetion food security intervention.

Topicwise Questions Overview

3/5 Marks Question

Question 1.
What is food security ? Mention any two factors which the food security depends upon ? (2015-6UU28PD, TPK98CB)
Answer:
(1) Food security means availability, accessibility and affordability of food to all people at all times.
(2) The factors which the food security depends upon are :
(i) Public Distribution System (PDS)
(ii) Government vigilence
(iii) action at times when this security is threatened.

What Is Food Security

1 Mark Questions (Obective Type)

Question 1.
What does food security mean ? _
(a) Availability of food
(b) Accessibility of food
(c) Availability and accessibility of food to all at all times.
(d) Availability, accessibility and affordability of food to all at all times. (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 11/BI, 2012-48041)
Answer:
(d) Availability, accessibility and affordability of food to all at all times

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 2.
What does accessibility mean ?
(a) Food is within reach of every person
(b) Food is within reach of rich person
(c) Food is within reach of poor person
(d) Food is within reach of rural people (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 48014)
Answer:
(a) Food is within reach of every person

Question 3.
Which of the following is not the dimension of food security in India ? (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 1078, 48020)
(a) Availability of food
(b) Accessibility of food
(c) Affordability of food
(d) Dependency on food
Answer:
(d) Dependency on food

3/5 Marks Question

Question 4.
Define the term food security and explain its three dimensions. (CBSE-2011, SA 2,18/Al)
Or
Describe briefly the concept of food security. (2015-1YSO4NN, Imp.)
Or
Write three dimensions of food security. (2015-6F8GLJL, Imp.)
Answer:
(1) Food security means enough food is available for all the persons and these persons have the capacity to buy food of acceptable quality and there is no barrier on access to food.
(2) Following are the three dimensions of food security :
(i) Availability : Availability of food means production within the country, food imports and the previous year’s stock stored in the government granaries.
(ii) Affordability of food: Affordability implies that an individual has enough money to buy sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet one’s dietary needs. That is, all persons have the capacity to buy food of acceptable quality.
(iii) Accessibility of food : Accessibility means food is within reach of every person. That is, there is no barrier on access to food.

Why Food Security

1 Mark Questions~(Objective Type)

Question 1.
The most devastating famine that occurred in India in 1943 was :
(а) The famine of Bengal
(b) The famine of Odisha
(c) The famine of Gujarat
(d) The famine of Rajasthan (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 25/BI)
Answer:
(a) The famine of Bengal

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 2.
Kalahandi is situated in which of the following states ? (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 06/Cl)
(a) Odisha
(b) Punjab
(c) Rajasthan
(d) Bihar
Answer:
(a) Odisha

Question 9.
Which of the following places is the evidence of starvation death during recent year? (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 48003)
(a) Chittor in Rajasthan
(b) Kashipur in Odisha
(c) Jabalpur in M.P.
(d) Saharanpur in U.P.
Answer:
(b) Kashipur in Odisha.

3/5 Marks Questions

Question 4.
Food security is essential in India. Justify the statement. (CBSE, 2011, SA2, 34/A1)
Why is there a need of food security in India? Give any three reasons. (2015-1K51AZT)
Or
Why is there need for self sufficiency in food ? Give any three reasons. (2015-KGY48AO)
Answer:
Following are the reasons for food security :
(1) The poorest section of the society might be food insecure most of the times while persons above the poverty line might also be food insecure during natural calamities.
(2) During natural calamities like drought, earthquake, flood, tsunami etc, total production of foodgrains decreases. It creates a shortage of food and the prices go up. At the high prices, some people cannot afford to buy food.
(3) High population growth and unequal production of foodgrains also lead to food insecurity.
(4) One of the major reasons for which we need food security is the corrupt administrative practices, hoarding and black marketing.
(5) In our country, even today, there are places like Kalahandi and Kashipur in Odisha where famine like conditions have been existing for many years. Starvation deaths are also reported in Baran district of Rajasthan, Palamau district of Jharkhand and many other remote areas during the recent years. Therefore, food security is needed in a country like India.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 5.
What were impacts of famine of Bengal in 1943 ? (2015-DFCFP5K, HEUWPLZ; 2014-VZYQ6GK, K901RGL, KX67CWT)
Answer:
(1) Any famine is characterised by widespread deaths due to starvation and epidemics caused by forced use of contaminated water or decaying food. Also, there is loss of body resistance due to weakening from starvation.
(2) The most devastating famine that occurred in India was the famine of Bengal in 1943. This famine killed 30 lakh people in the province of Bengal.
(3) The agricultural labourers, fishermen, transport workers and other casual-labourers were affected the most by dramatical increase in price of rice. They were the ones who died in this famine. But fortunately, nothing like the Bengal famine has happened in India again.

Who Are Food-Insecure

1 Mark Questions (Objective Type)

Question 1.
Why do the poor people suffer from chronic hunger ? (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 48022)
(a) Due to seasonal production of food grains.
(b) Due to very low income.
(c) Due to unavailability of food.
(d) Due to wrong policies of the government.
Answer:
(b) Due to very low income .

Question 2.
“Chronic Hunger” is : (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 1073, 48015)
(a) An expression of poverty.
(b) A consequence of diets persistently inadequate.
(c) Related to the cycles of food growing.
(d) When a person is unable to get work for entire year.
Answer:
(b) A consequence of diets persistently inadequate

Question 3.
Who amongst the following constitute an important segment of the food insecure population ? (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 48019)
(a) SCs and STs with poor land base.
(b) The people affected by natural disaster.
(c) OBCs with low land productivity.
(d) All the above.
Answer:
(d) All the above

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

3/5 Marks Questions

Question 4.
Explain the reasons for some states of India to be more food insecure. (2016-8SPAMB2; 2015-1DF7NW0, Imp.)
Answer:
(1) The food insecure people are disproportionately large in some regions of the country, such as economically backward states with high incidence of poverty.
(2) (i) Tribal and remote areas are more prone to food insecurity.
(it) Moreover, regions more prone to natural disasters, etc. are generally food insecure.

Question 5.
The food insecure people are disproportionately large in some regions of the country. Explain the statement with examples. (2015-0OBR6ZQ; 2014-3DDXXIO, TPXJ8CY)
Or
Which regions of India are prone to the food insecurity ?
Answer:
Following are the reasons that in some regions of the country, the food insecure people are disproportionately large in number :
(1) Some of these are economically backward states with high incidence of poverty.
(2) Some of these have vast tribal and remote areas.
(3) Some of these are more prone to natural disasters, etc.
(4) The social composition, deep-rooted caste system, political situations are also the responsible factors for it.
(5) The States of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Odisha, West Bengal, Chattisgarh part of Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra accounts for largest number of food insecure people in the country.

Question 6.
How does seasonal employment affect the food security? (2015-XWZRQPO, 6UJ7XP7)
Answer:
(1) Seasonal unemployment happens when people are not able to find jobs during some months of the year. People dependant upon agriculture usually face such kind of problem.
(2) Seasonal unemployment affects the food security very much. Actually, seasonal hunger is related to cycles of food growing and harvesting.
(3) As a result of the seasonal nature of agricultural activities, seasonal hunger is prevalent in rural areas.
(4) In urban areas, because of the casual labour e.g., there is less work for casual construction labour during the rainy season, people are more prone to food insecurity.
(5) Seasonal hunger, as a result of seasonal unemployment, exists when a person is unable to get work for some months of the year.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Food Security In India

1 Mark Questions (Objective Type)

Question 1.
Green Revolution is associated with the production of:
(a) Sugarcane
(b) Pulses
(c) Wheat
(d) Maize (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 29/A1, 16/BI; 2012-48030)
Answer:
(c) Wheat

Question 2.
Which of the following crops are related to Green Revolution ? (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 08/A!)
(a) Wheat, Rice
(b) Cotton, Bqjra
(c) Maize, Rice
(d) Bajra, Wheat
Answer:
(a) Wheat, Rice

Question 3.
Which stamp was released by Mrs. Indira Gandhi regarding impressive strides of the Green Revolution in July, 1968? (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 48040)
(a) Rice Revolution
(b) Green Revolution
(c) Wheat Revolution
(d) White Revolution
Answer:
(c) Wheat Revolution

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

3/5 Marks Questions

Question 4.
Explain any three measures adopted to attain self¬sufficiency in foodgrain since independence. (2015-N6N15CJ; 2014-43CEJVS, FVQKQ6M)
Answer:
After independence, Indiem policy makers adopted all measures to achieve self-sufficiency in foodgrains.
(1) India adopted a new strategy in agriculture, which resulted in ‘Green Revolution’ especially in the production of wheat and rice.
(2) This strategy included using multiple cropping and modem farming methods such as use of HYV seeds, chemical fertilizers, pesticides and improved irrigation methods for more farm output.
(3) The government has made the provision of Buffer Stock meant to distribute food-grains in the deficit areas and among the poorer strata of society at a price lower than the market price. This also helps resolve the problem of shortage of food during adverse weather conditions or during the periods of calamity.
(4) The government has made provision of Public Distribution System (PDS). This is meant for distribution of foodgrains among the poorer sections of the society through government regulated shops.
(5) The government has also initiated other food intervention programmes like Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), Food for Work Programme, Rural Wage Employment Programmes, Employment Guarantee Scheme, Sampuma Grameen Rojgar Yozna, Mid-Day Meal, etc.

Question 5.
How can we say that India has become self-sufficient in foodgrain production ? Explain. (2015-SMQ5MLK)
Answer:
(1) As a result of the Green Revolution, wheat production in India increased dramatically. The success of wheat was later replicated in rice.
(2) The highest rate of growth was achieved in Punjab and Haryana, where foodgrain production reached an all-time high of 275.68 million tonnes in 2016-17.
(3) Since the advent of the Green Revolution in the early 70s, the country has avoided famine even during adverse weather conditions. A variety of crops have been grown all over the country.
(4) The avialability of foodgrains at the country level has further been ensured with a carefully designed food security system by the government—Buffer Stock; and Public Distribution System.
(5) In 2014, the stock of wheat and rice with FCI was 65.3 million tonnes which was much more than the minimum buffer norms.

What Is Buffer Stock

1 Mark Questions (Objective Type)

Question 1.
F.C.I. stands for :
(a) Foreign Cooperation with India
(b) Food Corporation of India
(c) Fossil Corporation of India .
(d) Food Coming to India (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 08/Cl)
Answer:
(6) Food Corporation of India

Question 2.
The farmers are paid a pre-announced price for their crops known as :
(a) Whole sale price
(b) Fair price
(c) Minimum support price
(d) Maximum support price (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 16/A1, 25/A1)
Answer:
(c) Minimum support price

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 3.
The minimum guaranteed price at which the government offers to purchase any quantity is known as :
(a) Procurement Price
(b) Minimum Support Price
(c) Issue Price
(d) Market Price (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 21/A1)
Answer:
(b) Minimum Support Price 3/5 Marks Question

Question 4.
Write notes on :
((a) Procurement Price
(b) Minimum Support Price
(c) Issue Price
(d) Market Price
(2011-.CBSE-SA-II, 21/AL
Answer:
(b) Minimum Support Price

3/5 Marks Question

Question 4.
Write notes on:
(a) Buffer Stock
(b) Issue Price (NCERT TBQ 10 (b) & (c))
Or .
Defme Buffer Stock and Issue Price. (2017.OYYDR95)
Answer:
(a) Buffer Stock : Buffer Stock is the stock of foodgrains, namely wheat and rice procured by the government through Food Corporation of India (FCI).
(b) Issue Price : Buffer Stock is created by the government to distribute foodgrains in the areas and among the poorer strata of society at a price lower than the market price also known as Issue Price.

What Is The Public Distribution System

1 Mark Questions (Objective Type)

Question 1.
Full form of NFWP is :
(a) National Federation for Work and Process
(b) National Forest for Wildlife Protection
(c) National Food and Wheat Processing
(d) National Food for Work Programme (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 25/A1)
Answer:
(d) National Food for Work Programme

Question 2.
Which one of the following is not a Food Intervention Programme of India ? (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 48025)
(а) Wheat Revolution
(b) Public Distribution System
(c) Integrated Child Development Service
(d) Food-for-Work
Answer:
(a) Wheat Revolution

Question 3.
How many lakhs of ration shops are there all over the country ? (2012-CBSE-SA-II, 48011)
(a) 3.6
(b)4.6
(c) 5.6
(d) 6.6
Answer:
(6) 5.5

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

3/5 Marks Questions

Question 4.
Describe any five functions of the Public Distribution System in India. (2012-48021)
Answer:
(1) The food procured by the FCI is distributed through ‘government regulated ration shops at the price lower than the market price among the poorer section of the society. This is called the Public Distribution System (PDS).
(2) Ration shops are now present in most localities, villages, towns and cities. There are about 5.5 lakh ration shops all over the country.
(3) Ration shops are also known as Fair Price Shops that keep stock of foodgrains, sugar, kerosene oil for cooking.
(4) These items are sold to people at a price lower than the market price. Any family with a ration card can buy a stipulated amount of these items (e.g., 35 kg of grains, 5 litres of kerosene, 5 kgs of sugar etc.) every month from the nearby ration shop.
(5) The PDS has proved to be the most effective instrument of government policy in establishing prices and making food available to consumers at affordable prices.

Question 5.
Describe public distribution system (PDS) is the most important step taken by the government of India towards ensuring food security. (CBSE-2011-SA2, 11/BI)
Or
How does PDS ensure food security in India ? Explain. (2011-12/BI)
Answer:
(1) Public Distribution System focuses on subsidized distribution of the basic commodities to poor households at the fair price shops.
(2) The food procured by the FCI is distributed through government regulated ration shops among poorer sections of the society at a price lower than the market price.
(3) Any family with a ration card can buy stipulated quantities of grain, kerosene, sugar, etc. from the ration shops.
(4) In 1992, Revamped Public Distribution System was launched that provide benefits of PDS to remote and backward areas.
(5) In 1997, Targeted Public Distribution System was introduced that adopts the principle of targeting poor in all areas.

Role Of Co-Operatives In Food Security (Optional)

1 Mark Questions (Objective Type)

Question 1.
In which state of India the famous Co-oprative AMUL is situated ?
(a) Gujarat
(b) Maharashtra
(c) Delhi
(d) M.P. (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 16/BI; 2012-48034, 36)
Answer:
(a) Gujarat

Question 2.
The Mother Dairy is an important Co-operative in .
(a) Gujarat
(b) Punjab
(c) Haryana
(d) Delhi (2011-CBSE-SA-II, 08/A1)
Answer:
(d) Delhi.

3/5 Marks Questions

Question 3.
Give any five examples highlighting the significant role of co-operatives in providing food security in India.
Answer:
(1) The co-operative societies set up shops to sell low priced goods to poor people. For example, out of all fair price shops running in Tamil Nadu, around 94 per cent are being run by co-operatives.
(2) In Delhi, Mother Dairy is supplying milk and vegetables to the consumers at controlled rate decided by the Government of Delhi.
(3) Amul is another example of co-operative dealing in milk and milk products from Gujarat. It has brought about the White Revolution in the country.
(4) In Maharashtra, Academy of Development Science (ADS) has ‘
facilitated a network of NGOs for setting up Grain Banks in different regions.
(5) ADS organises training and capacity building programmes on food security for NGOs.

UP Board Solutions for Class 9 Social Science Economics Chapter 4 Food Security in India

Question 4.
What are the major objectives of Academy of Development Science in Maharashtra ? Explain. (2012-48016)
Answer:
(1) In Maharashtra, Academy of Development Science (ADS) has facilitated a network of NGOs for setting up Grain Banks in different regions’.
(2) ADS organises training and capacity building programmes on food security for NGOs.
(3) Grain Banks are now slowly taking shape in different parts of Maharashtra.
(4) ADS’s efforts to set up Grain Banks, to facilitate replication through other NGOs and to influence the Government’s policy on food security are thus, paying rich dividends.
(5) The ADS’s Grain Bank Programme is acknowledged as a successful and innovative food securing intervention. .

Question 5.
What are the major functions of Food Corporation of India ? (CBSE, 2011, SA2, 04/A1)
Or
What are the functions of food corporation of India ? (Annual Exam. (Delhi), 2009)
Answer:
(1) Food Corporation of India purchases wheat and rice from farmers in states where there is surplus production.
(2) The farmers are paid a pre-announced price for their produce.
This price is called Minimum Support Price (MPS), which is declared by the government and revised every year. ,
(3) FCI has its godowns all over India. It stores the purchased grains in these godowns to create buffer stock.
(4) FCI distributes foodgrains in the deficit areas and among the . poorer strata of society at a price lower than the market price.
(5) It plays a significant role in ensuring food security in India. ‘



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